• Science

    Life in 2020

    A diorama inspired by the turmoil that was life in the year 2020 A.D. 2020 truly was a year to remember, although most of us would probably rather forget. Starting with the COVID-19 epidemic, families were forced to adapt to a whole new way of living with the scare of an extinction level event. Stuck in our homes for social distancing we saw online business thrive, with corporations like amazon at the forefront. We dealt with the debates on what the proper course of action should be and the American people dealt with the struggle of not knowing what the future held. Then there was the rise in racial tension…

  • Nature

    Nettle Leaf

    Nettle leaf is a uniquely useful plant that has shown to support joint health and overall wellness. The plant itself (urtica dioica) has been known to have a bit of a sting due to the tiny hairs it possesses called trichomes that release a substance that is irritating to the skin almost immediately upon contact. However, the more commonly used nettle root has been used for over 2000 years as a powerful spring tonic. Nettle Root Nettle Root (also known as Alingatong) is used more widely than the plant’s leaves or stems. One of the most common ways that nettle root is made available is by making it into tea.…

  • Nature

    Milk Thistle and Other Special Herbs

    Milk thistle (scientifically known as Silybum marianum) has been used as a medicine since early Greco-Roman time. Milk thistle seed extract has been used for supporting the liver in detoxifying the blood. It also increases the flow of gastric juices relieving dyspepsia, indigestion and headaches associated with detoxification organ congestion. Silymarin also seems to protect the liver from Xenobiotic injury by altering the outer layer of cell membranes to prevent toxin penetration and enhances the synthesis of RNA and proteins in liver cells leading to cell regeneration Milk thistle is also useful as an antioxidant by inhibiting superoxide radical production, hydrogen peroxide production, and oxidative stress from high glucose concentrations.…

  • Nature

    Medicinal Herbs for Daily Health

    In this series we will go over a few plants and herbs that have been traditionally used medicinally throughout history. First of it is important to note that this a blog for informational purposes only and is not meant to be used as medical advice. It is always best to do proper research before deciding on any medicinal herbs or plants to use. If you are taking any prescription medication we recommend talking to your physician about interaction or any potential side effects before starting any herbal remedies. Turmeric root (pictured above) contains a yellow colored chemical called curcumin. Curcumin is unique in that it is used as a dye…

  • Nature

    Moths of the Sphingidae Family, The Gaudy Sphinx

    Around the world, some of the largest moths belong to the Sphingidae family. Sphingidae moths have long narrow wings and thick bodies that are covered in hairs. The fore-wings are much longer than the hind-wings. The hairy bodies are pointed at the head and back of the body. Because of their size and appearance, these moths are sometimes mistaken for hummingbirds — they are sometimes called hummingbird moths. And like hummingbirds, these moths hover over flowers to consume nectar. Other names you will often hear used for these moths are hawk moths and even sphinx moths; this is because when the larvae feed among the leaves and branches of a…

  • History,  Science

    The Pressure Cooker

    Pressure cooking is the process of cooking food at high pressure, employing water or a water-based cooking liquid, in a sealed vessel known as a pressure cooker. High pressure limits boiling and permits cooking temperatures well above 100 °C (212 °F) to be reached. Pressure cookers work by expelling air from the vessel, and trapping the steam produced from the boiling liquid inside. This raises the internal pressures and permits high cooking temperatures. This, together with high thermal heat transfer from the steam, cooks food far more quickly, often cooking in between half and a quarter the time for conventional boiling. After cooking the steam is released so that the…

  • Nature

    The Beaver

    Beavers are well-adapted for semi-aquatic life, with thick waterproof fur, a flattened tail that acts as a rudder, and closable nostrils and ears, as well as a transparent eye membrane. There are only two species of beaver. The American beaver (Castor canadensis) typically weighs 60 lbs. (27 kilograms) and are 23 to 39 inches (60 to 100 centimeters) long. The tail adds another 7.75 to 12 inches (20 to 30.5 cm) to its length, according to National Geographic. Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber) are around the same size. They usually weigh from 29 to 77 lbs. (13 to 35 kg) and are 29 to 53 in (73 to 135 cm) in…